CourierPostonline - South Jersey's Information Source CourierPostOnline front page South Jersey News Sports Entertainment Classifieds Jobs Cars Real Estate Shopping


Customer Service
· Subscribe Now
· Switch to EZ-Pay
· About Us

Today's Weather
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Metro Editor
Donna Jenkins
News Sections
South Jersey News
World Report
Sports
Business
Living
Opinion
Varsity
Weekly Sections
Communities
New! Nuestra Comunidad
Senior Scoop
South Jersey Living
South Jersey Scene
Static for Teens
Technology
Volunteers
Women on the Run
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Featured
In Our Community
Corrections
Dating
Gannett Foundation
In Memoriam
Lottery Results
Obituaries
Pets
Photo Galleries
New! Spot News Kids Korner
South Jersey Guide
Weddings, Engagements & Anniversaries
Thursday, August 11, 2005Past Issues - S | M | T | W | T | F | S
 
South Jersey

Saturday, August 1, 1998

300 people turn out to express support

By JEFF BEACH
Courier-Post staff

CAMDEN - Samuel Levy has a soft spot for warships, having barely survived a Japanese kamikaze (suicide) attack on the USS Wesson, a destroyer escort stationed in the South Pacific during World War II.

So he and his wife, Joy, didn't mind braving a little rain Friday morning to be among the first to arrive to greet the USS New Jersey Battleship Commission as it docked aboard a paddleboat at the New Jersey State Aquarium.

About 300 people from South Jersey, and some from as far away as Florida, would later join the Levys, of Haddonfield, to send the commission a clear message to make Camden's Waterfront the site for a battleship museum.

''My ship was given to Italy, and they later scrapped it, so you can never have that again,'' Levy said. ''For sentimental reasons, the New Jersey should come here. It was built here, and it can certainly be an attraction here.''

Like the Levys, others lined the Aquarium's promenade to show support for turning the ship - now mothballed in Washington state - into a museum on the Delaware River.

Over the past few months, people signing petitions to lure the battleship to New Jersey were encouraged to show up for the visit by the commission. Although thousands signed petitions, the weekday timing of the event and the rain that ironically gave way to sunshine just as the paddleboat docked, kept the welcoming committee's numbers lower than expected.

Some tried inventive ways to gain the commission's attention. Russ Homan of Cherry Hill brought his speedboat up the river with a sign reading: ''Camden and USS New Jersey, Perfect Together.'' Aquarium management unfurled a huge American flag from the building's roof, augmented by a banner urging the ship's return.

''I spent time on the ship in the Naval Reserves in the 1950s, and when the thought came about to bring it to Camden, I was interested,'' said Homan, whose 24-foot speedboat with banner caught the eye of many onlookers. ''I just got a crazy idea and said, 'I'll put a sign on the boat and take a ride down there.''



Copyright 2005 Courier-Post. Use of this site signifies your agreement to the Terms of Service (updated December, 2002).
For questions, comments, or problems
contact us.

The Courier-Post is a part of Gannett Co. Inc., parent company of USA Today.

FIND A JOB
FIND A CAR
FIND A HOME
CLASSIFIEDS
Deals and Coupons
Auto Deals
Consumer Web Directory
Coupons
End of Month Values
Customer Central
Subscribe
Customer Service
About Us
Contacts
Advertise
Courier-Post Store
Jobs at the Courier-Post
Jobs with Gannett