CourierPostOnline front page South Jersey News Sports Entertainment Classifieds Jobs Cars Real Estate Shopping


Customer Service
· Subscribe Now
· Switch to EZ-Pay
· About Us

Today's Weather
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Metro Editor
Donna Jenkins
News Sections
South Jersey News
World Report
Sports
Business
Living
Opinion
Varsity
Weekly Sections
Communities
New! Nuestra Comunidad
Senior Scoop
South Jersey Living
South Jersey Scene
Static for Teens
Technology
Volunteers
Women on the Run
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Featured
In Our Community
Corrections
Dating
Gannett Foundation
In Memoriam
Lottery Results
Obituaries
Pets
Photo Galleries
New! Spot News Kids Korner
South Jersey Guide
Weddings, Engagements & Anniversaries
Thursday, August 11, 2005Past Issues - S | M | T | W | T | F | S
 
South Jersey

Monday, September 24, 2001
Docking pilot considers it `a real honor' to coordinate move of USS New Jersey

By KIM MAIALETTI
Courier-Post Staff
CAMDEN

Curt Chamberlain laughs when friends ask him for help docking their 45-foot pleasure-cruising boats.

"I can't dock those little things," Chamberlain, 56, said Sunday. "I have to have something big."

Something like the battleship USS New Jersey.

Chamberlain served as the battleship's docking pilot Sunday morning, steering it up the Delaware River and easing it against the pier by issuing directions over walkie-talkies to tugboats hundreds of feet below his perch on the upper part of the ship's bridge.

From there, Chamberlain can see the stern, the bow and the water surrounding the ship.

He is a fifth-generation maritime operator. His father was a docking pilot on the Delaware. His grandfather towed barges and his great-grandfather and great-great- grandfather worked as schooner captains.

"I was 4 years old working on tugs," Chamberlain said. "It' s in your blood. It's really in your blood."

Chamberlain, who works for McAllister Towing in Camden, is one of 15 docking pilots that operate on the Delaware.

He routinely handles 1,100-foot tankers and ships with twice the battleship's tonnage.

"I like moving things that are so large," Chamberlain said. "It's a natural high when you're done. It would put some fear in the average person."

Even though the USS New Jersey, at 887 feet long and 45,000 tons, may seem small by comparison, Chamberlain enjoyed moving it.

"To me, it's a real thrill, a real honor to move a ship like the New Jersey," Chamberlain said. "We don't get to move warships in our everyday line of work."

Email this story to a friend
 


Copyright 2005 Courier-Post. Use of this site signifies your agreement to the Terms of Service (updated December, 2002).
For questions, comments, or problems
contact us.

The Courier-Post is a part of Gannett Co. Inc., parent company of USA Today.

FIND A JOB
FIND A CAR
FIND A HOME
CLASSIFIEDS
Deals and Coupons
Auto Deals
Consumer Web Directory
Coupons
End of Month Values
Customer Central
Subscribe
Customer Service
About Us
Contacts
Advertise
Courier-Post Store
Jobs at the Courier-Post
Jobs with Gannett